Cultural Affairs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Upcoming Events

The Four Horsemen of Structural Racism: Income Inequality, the Changing Structures of Cities, the Underdevelopment of Black Neighborhoods and Individual White Racism – and How They Relate to the Ferguson, Missouri Case
Tuesday, September 15, 2015
1:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

The killing of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014, shattered the myth of a post-racial America and forced the nation to once again confront its ugly legacy of racism and violence. However, there is more to this story than the police shooting of yet another black man. Henry Louis Taylor Jr., Ph.D., professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning and founding director of the Center for Urban Studies at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, probes the Ferguson experience by analyzing what he calls the Four Horsemen of Structural Racism: unequal distribution of wealth, metropolitan city building, the neoliberal housing market and individual white racism. The racist dynamics that created Ferguson, he argues, are operative in most cities and metropolitan regions across America. A reception, sponsored by the Student Senate, follows the presentation.


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Dangers of Drug Use Lecture
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

Debra L. Person is the founder and executive director of Exodus 3 Ministries, Inc. (E3M) in Syracuse, a not-for-profit, faith-based organization that provides spiritual counseling, emotional support and other services to women and families. Person endured molestation and rape growing up, eventually turning to drugs as a means of coping with the pain and trauma. As a result, she was a drug addict for many years before she turned her life around and began helping others. In addition to sharing her life story, Person warns her listeners about the dangers and long-term consequences of drug use.

 

Artist Discussion with Tom Nicol
Thursday, September 17, 2015
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Join artist Tom Nicol for a discussion. His exhibit, With Which, is on display in the Teaching Gallery from Sept. 17- Oct. 24.

 

With Which: Works by Tom Nicol Opening Reception
Thursday, September 17, 2015
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Teaching Gallery, located in Administration Building

Join artist Tom Nicol for an opening reception of his exhibit, With Which. This exhibit is on  display in the Teaching Gallery through Oct. 24.

 

Elizabeth Woodbury Kasius and Heard
Friday, September 18, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Elizabeth Woodbury Kasius and HeardWith jazz roots and influences from West Africa, Brazil and beyond, the original world music of Heard is described as energetic, joyous, fresh and fun. Led by composer and pianist Elizabeth Woodbury Kasius, Heard features Jonathan Greene on woodwinds, Bobby Kendall on bass, Brian Melick on drums and percussion, and vocalist Zorkie Nelson.

 

Phil Klay: Redeployment
Thursday, September 24, 2015
3:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Phil KlayReading from his short story collection, “Redeployment,” author and U.S. Marine Corps veteran Phil Klay takes readers to the front lines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to understand what happened there and what happened to the soldiers who returned.

Klay, who served in Iraq’s Anbar Province from January 2007 to February 2008 as a public affairs officer, creates characters who struggle to make meaning out of chaos in stories interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival.

Redeployment won the National Book Award for Fiction. The author was shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor Prize and named a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree. He received the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation James Webb Award.

 

Mass Incarceration and the Movement for Change Lecture
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

Dr. Alice Green, executive director and founder of the Center for Law and Justice in Albany, describes mass incarceration in America, its history and impact, and the growing movement to change this phenomenon. The Center for Law and Justice seeks the fair and just treatment of all people throughout the civil and criminal justice systems and works to reduce reliance upon incarceration. Dr. Green’s appearance is co-sponsored by the Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle programming series.

 

From Convict to Conviction: A Grassroots Vision for Criminal Justice Reform in America Lecture
Tuesday, October 6, 2015
11:00 am – 11:50 am
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

Glenn E. Martin, president and founder of JustLeadershipUSA, explores the growth of mass incarceration, mass supervision and mass criminalization in the United States, as well as his organization’s vision to achieve meaningful and long-lasting criminal justice reform.

 

A More Welcoming, Inclusive & Safer Troy: Active Participation in Social Justice on a Local Level
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Bush Memorial Hall at Russell Sage College, 65 1st Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA

Learn how you can participate in this newly formed social justice group that is planning city-wide initiatives to honor diversity and create a welcoming, inclusive and safe community in Troy. College students and others are all welcome to take part in this community action. This event is led by the Troy Interfaith Clergy Fellowship in collaboration with the Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group.


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

The Chronicles
Thursday, October 8, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Maureen Stapleton Theatre in Siek Campus Center

The Chronicles combine jazz, hip hop, funk, soul and gospel music in a unique sound. Founders Brian Brundige on trombone and Jeff Nania on saxophones and flute are joined by Tyrone Hartzog on keyboard, Justin Henricks on guitar, Daniel Lawson on bass, Andrae Surgick on drums.The Chronicles

 

“Freedom Riders” Film Screening (First Half)
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Room 225

Freedom Riders profiles the civil rights activists who challenged segregation in the American South in 1961. As described by WGBH’s “American Experience,” the film is the powerful, harrowing and ultimately inspirational story of six months in 1961 that changed America forever. From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives – and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment – for simply traveling together
on buses and trains through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.

Produced by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Freedom Riders features testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand. The two-hour documentary is based on Raymond Arsenault’s book, “Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.”


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

“Freedom Riders” Film Screening
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Room 225

Freedom Riders profiles the civil rights activists who challenged segregation in the American South in 1961. As described by WGBH’s “American Experience,” the film is the powerful, harrowing and ultimately inspirational story of six months in 1961 that changed America forever. From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives – and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment – for simply traveling together
on buses and trains through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.

Produced by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Freedom Riders features testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand. The two-hour documentary is based on Raymond Arsenault’s book, “Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.”


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Implications of Nanotechnology on Human and Environmental Health Lecture
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

The rapid growth and projected acceleration of nanotechnology create urgency in understanding, predicting and managing the potential health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials. Dr. Sara Brenner, a preventive medicine and public health physician at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science& Engineering (CNSE), speaks about the safety implications of engineered nanomaterials.

 

“Freedom Riders” Film Screening (Second Half)
Thursday, October 22, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Room 225

Freedom Riders profiles the civil rights activists who challenged segregation in the American South in 1961. As described by WGBH’s “American Experience,” the film is the powerful, harrowing and ultimately inspirational story of six months in 1961 that changed America forever. From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives – and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment – for simply traveling together
on buses and trains through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.

Produced by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Freedom Riders features testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand. The two-hour documentary is based on Raymond Arsenault’s book, “Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.”


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

“Freedom Riders” Film Screening
Thursday, October 22, 2015
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Room 225

Freedom Riders profiles the civil rights activists who challenged segregation in the American South in 1961. As described by WGBH’s “American Experience,” the film is the powerful, harrowing and ultimately inspirational story of six months in 1961 that changed America forever. From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives – and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment – for simply traveling together
on buses and trains through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.

Produced by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Freedom Riders features testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand. The two-hour documentary is based on Raymond Arsenault’s book, “Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.”


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Azar Nafisi: Humanities and the Future of Democracies
Friday, October 23, 2015
11:00 am
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Azar NafisiAzar Nafisi, a native of Iran, discusses her newest book, “The Republic of Imagination: A Life in Books.” In it, she looks at the democratic society that gave birth to the great English and American novels, and makes a powerful and passionate case for the vital role of fiction in society today.

A fellow at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, she will explore why we need humanities today, how far the present economic and political crisis is rooted in the larger crisis of vision, how
far the imagination opens the spaces that a totalitarian regime closes, and whether a democracy can thrive without a democratic imagination.

Ten years ago, Nafisi electrified readers with her memoir “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” a multi-million copy bestseller that examined the vital role of imagination – and great English and American novels in particular – in preserving the soul and combating the noxious ideology of a totalitarian society.

Her book won diverse literary awards.

 

Moderated Discussion of “Freedom Riders”
Thursday, October 29, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Multipurpose Room (second floor)

Dr. Paul T. Murray, a professor of Sociology specializing in race relations, collective behavior, and research methods at Siena College, leads this discussion. He is the author of “The Civil Rights Movement: References and Resources” and numerous articles and reviews published in scholarly journals and reference works. His current research focuses on Catholic activists in the Civil Rights Movement. During the 1960s, Dr. Murray was active in the Civil Rights Movement, and this year led a celebration of the anniversary of the Selma, Alabama, March. A lunch, provided by the Black and Latino Student Union, follows the presentation.


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights
Monday, November 2, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Award-winning author Steve Sheinkin talks about his book, “The Port Chicago 50,” a World War II civil rights story about a group of African American sailors – many of them teenagers – who were assigned to load ammunition at Port Chicago, a segregated naval base in California. They were never trained to handle ammunition safely and were constantly being rushed by their officers. When a terrifying disaster rocked the base, the men faced the toughest decision of their lives: should they return to duty as ordered, or risk everything to take a stand against segregation in the military?


The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and film screenings that takes a look at racism and civil rights in America today while also examining the history of our nation’s civil rights movement. Talks will be presented by leading civil rights scholars, and the highly acclaimed documentary, Freedom Riders, will be screened and discussed. All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

White Nose Syndrome: The Darkest of Nights for North American Bats Lecture
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

Alan Hicks, retired bat biologist for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, tells the story of White Nose Syndrome. Detected in the Capital Region in 2006, the disease has killed millions of bats across an everwidening portion of the continent and has driven some bat species to the edge of extinction. Hicks also describes similar human-induced catastrophes that are now threatening the natural world.

 

Artist Discussion with Joanna Tam
Thursday, November 5, 2015
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Join artist Joanna Tam for a discussion. Her exhibit, American Studies, is on display in the Teaching Gallery from Nov. 5 – Dec. 12.

 

American Studies: Works by Joanna Tam Opening Reception
Thursday, November 5, 2015
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Teaching Gallery, located in Administration Building

Join artist Joanna Tam for an opening reception of her exhibit, American Studies. This exhibit is on display in the Teaching Gallery through Dec. 12.

 

KoriSoron
Friday, November 6, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

KoriSoronKoriSoron, an instrumental acoustic trio, combines rock and progressive influences with musical traditions from across the globe. Guitarists Scott Collins and Farzad Golpayegani along with percussionist Dean Mirabito bring their international touring and recording experience to the Capital Region.

 

CC Vagabonds
Thursday, November 12, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

CC VagabondsPlaying gypsy jazz, standards and western swing music, the CC Vagabonds promise to grab your attention. Lead guitarist Zack Cohen, violinist Colin McCoy, double bassist Mike Jenkins and rhythm guitarist Peter G. Fisher are all local musicians with more than 40 years of experience and training.

 

Putting Together The Pieces of Body Modification: A Panel Discussion
Wednesday, November 18, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium and Meeting Rooms

This panel discussion addresses the psychological aspects, legal implications and health risks of body piercing and tattooing. John R. Ostwald, associate professor at Hudson Valley Community College, will explain how perceptions about one’s body can either fortify or erode a person’s self-esteem, emotional wellness and ability to develop relationships. Veronica Barber, a third-year student at Albany Law School, will report on the lack of regulation of discrimination on physical appearance and share her own experiences. Rosemary N. Ostwald, senior sanitarian at the NYS Department of Health, will present the public health risks associated with body art. William P. Kent, Hudson Valley Community College student, will be the moderator.