Community and Professional Education
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Winter/Spring 2015 Offerings: Center for Creative Retirement

Mrs. JJ Brown: Survivor of the Titanic: New Visually Enhanced Program
Mrs. JJ Brown, or "Molly Brown," became a legend after her survival as one of the first-class passengers on the ill-fated maiden voyage of the Titanic. Dismiss the wild and exaggerated stories (and the nickname!) that have been attributed to her, and listen as she relates the fascinating details of her real life. Born of Irish parents in poverty, she moved West as a young woman, married for love, and soon after, unexpectedly found herself the wife of a wealthy man. Energetic and involved, she invested her time and money in many worthy causes – juvenile delinquency programs, collecting art for public museums and the women's suffrage movement. A world traveler, she will lead you on a virtual tour of the famed ship and tell the vividly illustrated tale of the famous disaster first-hand - the reluctance of passengers to leave an "unsinkable" ship, the filling and lowering of lifeboats in the freezing darkness, and the surreal sight of the mighty liner slipping into the sea.
60035
$19
1 Session, WIL 113
Wed., 4/1, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

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Lucy Larcom: A New England Mill Worker in the 19th Century: New Visually Enhanced Program
Lucy Larcom, later to become a noted poet and educator, began her working life in a New England textile factory in the 1830s. As a young mill worker, Lucy lived the life that many young farm girls experienced in the early days of America's Industrial Revolution. See the New England textile mill – America's great contribution to the Industrial Revolution – as she saw it on a daily basis; floor by floor, the operatives - many of them children - at their noisy, swiftly moving machines, each performing his/her task that transformed raw cotton into cloth under the same roof, powered by the force of swiftly flowing water. Coupled with audience participation activities that approximate some of the aspects of textile production, you will see how the "American System" of manufacturing evolved, creating a modern consumer society with all of its benefits and ills.
60074
$19
1 Session, WIL 113
Wed., 4/22, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

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NEW!
"Victory Turned into Mourning:" Farewell to Lincoln and Grant at the New York State Capitol

One hundred and fifty years ago, as the nation mourned its martyred president, a special funeral train journeyed from Washington D.C. to Springfield, Illinois. Albany was one of the major stops on its route and on April 26, Abraham Lincoln's body lay in state in the old State Capitol building while 50,000 people filed by to pay their respects. At the exact same time, over 400 miles to the south, assassin John Wilkes Booth was cornered in a tobacco barn, shot by a New York cavalryman, and later died of his wounds.

Thirty years later, the New York State Capitol was once again the scene of a somber farewell as President Ulysses S. Grant lay in state in the new Capitol Building. This program will explore these two solemn events and their connection to the New York State Capitol.
60479
$10
1 session, WIL 113
Thurs., 4/9, 10 a.m. - Noon
Stuart W. Lehman, Instructor

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The Flowers of Spring: Their Design, Color and Texture
Spoil yourself by spending a morning with a versatile floral artist, who can design a classical look but make it follow the latest trend? Take advantage of Michele Peters' 29 years of experience and let her show you how you can put creativity and energy into your own designs and events. If you have been with us before, you know Michele brings a passion for what she does. Many return because they know she always brings fresh ideas and demonstrates what is "hot" in the flower world. Come join us as we "ohh and ahh."You may be one of the lucky students who carries one of her creations home! Course fee includes a $13 materials fee per person.
60552
$23
1 Session, WIL 113
Tues., 4/14, 9:30 a.m. - Noon
Michele Peters, Instructor

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NEW!
Those Necessary Unmentionables: 300 Years of Ladies' Underwear

This slide lecture covers what was considered the ideal woman's figure as it evolved over a time frame of 1680 - 1900. What was considered the perfect body in 1680 was just the opposite by the end of the 19th century. While fashion certainly played a key role, it was the undergarments that shaped and supported everything. This class will examine ladies' undergarments in detail while explaining how they were the foundation for how garments exaggerated different areas of anatomy from century to century. Breasts, hips and waists were all treated in a variety of ways and depended upon underwear to achieve the right look. Today a natural look is desired with comfort playing a role in design. It is certainly nothing like the literal torture women went through to appear fashion forward for their time.
60467
$18
1 Session, WIL 113
Thurs., 4/30, 10 a.m. - Noon
Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

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Greek and Roman Mythology
Do you know the significance behind the "Mount Ida" neighborhood in Troy? What is the origin of the world "tantalize"? Why is there a change of seasons? What is the significance of the term "Achilles heel"? How did spiders come to be? Find out these and many other answers in this course that discusses the gods and goddesses and the mythology of the ancient Greeks and Romans.
60510
$25
2 Sessions, DCC B06
Thurs., 3/19 & 3/26, 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Dan O'Callaghan, Instructor

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NEW!
Introduction to Nose Work for Dogs

Looking for a new and fun activity to do with your best friend? Nose work is an up-and-coming sport in the dog world. It began on the West Coast and has quickly caught on, all across the nation. Nose work is based on dog detection work and it originated with the military and police. You can do nose work for fun, or take it up a notch and compete at trials.

The benefits to you and your dog are two-fold:

  1. Greater bonding while working together as a team.
  2. An activity that will help to calm Rover down by providing a new mental challenge.

Very few tools are necessary to start, you will need: any age dog (puppy to senior), lots of doggie treats, and empty boxes. In class, you will learn how to get your dog started in the search process, what a "red bandana" dog is, and locations to have your dog search.

Please… this is not a paws-on-class, DON'T bring your dog! Demo dogs will be on hand to show you the training steps.
60545
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Tues., 3/31, 1 - 3 p.m.
Mel Witkowski and Joanne Hughes, Instructors

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Chippendale Furniture In America
Chippendale furniture flourished in America during the mid-18th century when the country was between wars and prospering. It was the second style during the Georgian Period when several king Georges ruled England. Under King George I, the Queen Ann genre was popular until it soon began to be replaced by the new Chippendale.

What is unique about the Chippendale style is that it consisted of the first furniture designs to be illustrated in book form. Thomas Chippendale was born into a family of cabinet-makers. He not only worked in his own shop making furniture, but published a book in 1754. "The Gentleman And Cabinet-Maker's Director," the first publication of its kind, had over 160 engravings that could be copied. By 1760, the design book was being used in America and became so popular it was republished twice more.

The slide lecture will begin in the Queen Ann Period and demonstrate how this earlier form inspired Chippendale before he added several more design influences to found his own unique style. Included will be furniture from New England, Pennsylvania and New York in both country and formal versions.

By the end of the 18th century, Chippendale's design books, his superior marketing skills and entrepreneurial expertise gave his name to this style of furniture, wherever and by whomever was producing it.
60468
$18
1 Session, WIL 113
Fri., 5/1 10 a.m. - Noon
Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

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Introduction to Folk Music Using Fiddle, Banjo, Guitar and Song
Come whet your musical appetite while hearing the history and sounds of roots music. Listen to music from Scotland, Ireland, Canada, New England and Appalachia. Combine this with a discussion of how these sounds developed and you have one rousing presentation. George Wilson, accomplished fiddler, folk music educator and performer, has planned a great morning for the music lover in you! Join the fun!
60042
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Fri., 3/20, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
George Wilson, Instructor

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NEW!
The Journey Through Musicals Continues "To Life" Parts IX and X

To Life - Part IX
Part IX of the "To Life" series, which illustrates Broadway songs with themes of making the most of every day, features memorable and nostalgic scenes with Broadway icons recreating classic musical theatre moments... Ethel Merman and Mary Martin sing a medley of songs from 1953's Ford Anniversary show.... Carol Lawrence, Larry Kert, Robert Goulet, Carol Channing and Barbara Cook sing from WEST SIDE STORY, CAMELOT, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, and THE MUSIC MAN... Liza Minnelli sings "New York, New York" and sings and dances to "Steppin' Out"... and... John Raitt and Mary Martin appear in scenes from the national tour of ANNIE GET YOUR GUN...

To Life - Part X
The last program of the "To Life" series features American love songs with medleys by Rodgers and Hart, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter and George Gershwin... sung by Dolores Gray, John Raitt and Ethel Merman. Part X also pays tribute to the five composers and lyricists of the Golden Age of the American Musical, who are over 80 years old and still writing in their sixth and seventh decades... Stephen Sondheim (COMPANY, A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC, SWEENEY TODD), Charles Strouse(ANNIE, BYE BYE BIRDIE), Sheldon Harnick (FIDDLER ON THE ROOF, SHE LOVES ME) John Kander (CHICAGO, CABARET ), and Jerry Herman (HELLO DOLLY, MAME, LA CAGE AUX FOLLES) , whose optimistic song "The Best of Times" will end the "To Life" series...
60034
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Wed. 3/25, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Richard Feldman, Instructor

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Digital Photography
This two-session offering will concentrate on learning how to effectively use your new (or not-so-new) digital camera. You will learn about exposure, white balance, macro-mode, portrait settings, landscapes, bracketing – all complex techniques that can be easily explained and mastered. Gather your favorite photos, organize your questions and bring along your camera and owner's manual to these classes designed to inform in a relaxed, comfortable format. Remember to have the camera's battery fully charged and have an empty memory card.
60187
$10
2 Sessions, WIL 113
Tues., May 12 & 19, 1 - 4 p.m.
Kevin Sarsfield, Instructor

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NEW!
The American Circus

Children of all ages, the American circus originated in Albany, New York! Here was born the circus train, circus tent, bleachers and the Showboat. And the man who made it all happen is buried in Albany Rural Cemetery.

For the history of the menagerie, bandwagon and general tom foolery that is so much a part of every circus, we will take a virtual tour of the Elephant Hotel in Somers, New York. Be prepared to be amazed and astounded. See the genuine suit worn by General Tom Thumb when he was presented to Queen Victoria. Gasp in awe at the poster advertising that George Washington's very own nursemaid is alive and well and wishes to meet you in Barnum's House of Wonder. But please don't touch the old masters hanging on the walls, their paint is still wet! This way to the egress!

Harry Truman said, "The only thing new in the world is the history you don't know." Tom Allison returns with another of his talks on forgotten history, and this is one with local roots.
60504
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Mon., 3/30, 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
J. Thomas Allison, Instructor

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NEW!
The American Cookbook

Where did America's favorite foods originate? The woman who invented the layer cake also wrote a famous Thanksgiving poem. Another cookbook author went to prison, not for plagiarizing recipes though it should have been. One of the best known cookbook authors has had more facelifts than Joan Rivers. Meet them all.

We have our immigrant ancestors to thank for the American cookbook, a true national treasure. As women left the old country, they brought with them bits of paper with the knowledge of what people ate in their home town.

Today, as many men as women can be found in the kitchen, so this morning is going to be coed. If you have an old cookbook, bring it for show and tell.

Tom Allison returns with another of his illustrated talks, this time on a topic closer to our stomachs than our hearts. He came to appreciate the cookbook when he was asked to edit one for his church and had a centerfold for Hudson Valley magazine photographed in his dining room. His talks always have a personal history to them.
60505
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Mon., 4/27 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
J. Thomas Allison, Instructor

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NEW!
Beef 101

Jaime Ortiz, executive chef and general manager of 677 Prime, will lead the class through a delicious experience, giving you an inside look into the world of high-end beef. His fabulous menu consists of grilled flat iron steak and goat cheese flatbread with red wine, onions, arugula and crispy shallots, slow-cooked Kobe beef cheeks with sweet potato polenta and a trio of steak samples: prime ribeye, petite filet and prime NY strip served with truffled steak fries and coconut cream pie. Includes $59 materials fee.
60567
$69
1 Session, Different Drummer's Kitchen
Tues., 4/28, 2 - 4:30 p.m.
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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NEW!
St. Patrick's Day Feast

Join the festivities and celebrate St. Patrick's Day with your friends here at Different Drummer's Kitchen! Deanna Fox will lead the class through a delicious menu of classic Irish dishes. Students will see all dishes prepared and eat the feast together. Our fabulous menu includes: irish brown bread, home-made braised corned beef and cabbage, colcannon potatoes and Guinness cake with chocolate ganache. Includes $55 materials fee.
60568
$65
1 Session, Different Drummer's Kitchen
Thurs., 3/12 Noon - 2:30 p.m.
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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NEW!
Healing Through Storytelling: A Workshop That will Nurture Your Inner Child

After the presentation of a story, the workshop will focus on storytelling as a healing art, a communication art and a way to build confidence when making presentations in front of an audience. The participants will learn proper breathing techniques, how to be more expressive both vocally and physically and how to get in touch with their own stories.

This workshop will employ the use of participatory exercises that will help people become more comfortable with their intuitive sense and their ability to express themselves in front of an audience. The story that will be told at the beginning of the workshop will be one that has great meaning for me. I will discuss how I went about learning it and why it feels so special.

Each person will share a story and begin to understand its deeper meaning. Everyone will have the opportunity to experience the healing and catharsis that happens when you bring a meaningful story to life.
60466
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Mon., 4/13, 1 - 3 p.m.
Dee Wind, Instructor

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NEW!
One Soldier's Account: The Battle of the Bulge and the Conquest of Germany

Ray Gantter was raised in a German-speaking household in Syracuse. During WW II, he fought in the Battle of the Bulge and then eastward into the Third Reich. Along the way he interviewed German POWs and had surprising conversations with German civilians. He wrote down everything he could remember about his foes and their families. Combining these accounts with inspiring tales about his fellow GIs, Ray authored "Roll Me Over," a book that is now recognized by historians as one of the gems of WW II literature. Steve Trimm, Ray's nephew, will talk about his uncle and read excerpts from his book.
60481
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Thurs., 3/26, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Steve Trimm, Instructor

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Ancestry.com: Setting Up Your Family Tree and Effective Searching
Ancestry.com is the internet's largest genealogy Web site, with over 1.87 million users worldwide. Its many features can be a great advantage to those researching their family history, but all that information can also be confusing and intimidating. Join professional genealogist Lisa Dougherty to find out what exactly Ancestry.com has to offer, how to perform effective searches, find the information you are looking for, and how to create an online family tree that is both accurate and interesting enough to share!
60482
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Tues., 4/28, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

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Search for Your Irish Ancestors
Researching Irish-American ancestors can be quite a challenge for family historians. Even experienced genealogists can become frustrated at the lack of information and all those records that just say "Ireland" as a place of origin. Join "genealogist-in-residence" for the Irish American Heritage Museum Lisa Dougherty for some suggestions on how to find that elusive Irish hometown, and what records are available for researching once you get there.
60040
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Tues., 3/31, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

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Medicare 101
Medicare can be very confusing. There are many options and factors to consider. It is important to understand how Medicare works and what you need to know to make the most informed decisions possible. Medicare Parts A and B will be explained, including what is and is not covered. This session will also cover what a person's fiscal responsibility is, and the ways to mitigate the potential co-pays of Medicare. You'll learn what a Medigap plan is and how Medicare Part D (prescription drug insurance) works. In addition, you'll learn about federal and state assistance programs for those who are income qualified.
60186
$10
2 Sessions, WIL 161
Thurs., 4/30 - 5/7, 10 - 11:30 a.m.
Janet Kiffney, Instructor

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Antiques and More
Come spend an engaging morning that will touch on history, geography, the arts and society. Owners Andrew Geller and David Ornstein of New Scotland Antiques will appraise a treasure that you bring to class. Bring in an item that you are curious about, set it on the table and when class begins, Andy and David will discuss each and every object! They'll cover the history of the item, its popularity and what it's worth in today's market.
60078
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Wed., 4/15, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Andrew Geller and David Ornstein, Instructors

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Become a Long Term Care Ombudsman
Looking for a challenge? Become a volunteer Ombudsman in the New York State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. Our neighbors who live in nursing homes and adult care residences need your help to advocate on their behalf to ensure they experience the highest quality of care and quality of life while living in these communities. The basic problem is that residents in these homes often have little or no contact with the outside world. Or they may feel they have little control over their own lives.

So, what does a volunteer Ombudsman do? It might be as simple as a quiet conversation, as ordinary as seeing that meals are served on time, as complex as helping families stay in touch. Every problem is a challenge, and every solution is a victory for hope and comfort and a better quality of life.

It takes 36 hours training of classroom training, and a great deal of dedication, to become an Ombudsman. An Ombudsman is expected to spend 2 to 4 hours a week – sometimes even more – visiting these residents, listening to their stories, helping them cope with problems, supporting their requests for improved conditions.

The Long Term Care Ombudsman Program needs more people like you, people who want to help, to guide, to solve problems for residents living in our long term care facilities. Come to this presentation with Rich Haldeman and Edie Sennett-Jozwiak, Ombudsman Coordinators in the Capital Region, and they will give you real-life examples of what you'll find as a volunteer Ombudsman, the problems you'll face and the satisfaction you'll feel.
60465
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Tues., 3/10, 10 - 11:30 a.m.
Rich Haldeman and Edie Sennett, Instructor

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NEW!
Some Aspects of New York State and the War of 1812

In honor of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, Robert E. Mulligan, retired New York State Museum curator of military history, will display part of his collection of miniature soldiers of 1812, recreating the Battle of Queenston Heights, and highlighting the roles played by Albany's Solomon Van Rensselaer of Cherry Hill and Troy's Captain John E. Wool, the hero of the battle.

Mulligan will also discuss America's lack of preparation for the war, the role of the New York Militia, Albanians Philip and Stephen van Rensselaer, strategies, New York's anti-war politics, and who actually "won" the war.
60550
$17
1 Session, WIL 113
Thurs., 4/16, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Robert E. Mulligan, Instructor

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Baseball in the Capital District: Part III
Join us as Frank Keetz continues his talk about baseball in the Capital District! Author of five books/ booklets and monographs, Frank will keep a smile on your face as he continues his heart-warming stories. This time he will discuss the 1946-1957 Schenectady Blue Jays and their Eastern League opponents. In 2014, Frank was inducted into the New York State Baseball Hall of Fame. Join us if you, too, love the game!
60549
$13
1 Session, WIL 113
Wed., 5/6, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Frank Keetz, Instructor

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An Introduction to Volkssporting in the Capital District
Have we got your attention? Come and learn about Volkssporting, a German word for "the sport of the people." What is this movement that has over 300 members right here in our Capital area? New York State has four active clubs, and throughout the US are over 300 clubs with walks and maps to explore new horizons on your vacations and your home area. Some folks start walking as a better road to physical fitness, but then continue due to friendships and fun club activities.

Our first hour will be a presentation on what is volkssporting, with a question and answer time. You will then be given directions to the Best Western Franklin Inn in downtown Troy where our walk will begin. You will have approximately 30 minutes to drive yourself to the Best Western for the second part of the class. You'll need your sneakers for a one hour Troy guided walk - 5K (3.1 miles). Bring a return address label for walk registration, a bottle of water to keep hydrated during the walk and dress appropriately for the outside weather while exercising. You will be encountering some uneven surfaces throughout our Troy walk, so be prepared.

Following the walk, an optional restaurant visit for lunch, pay your own way, will be arranged for wrap up and conversation. Put on your sneakers and start walking for fun, fitness and friendships.
60021
$12
1 Session, WIL 113 Orientation then Best Western Franklin Inn Troy, NY
Mon., 3/23, 9 a.m. - Noon
Lea Darling and Eileen Skinner, Instructors

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TRIPS AND TOURS

Please note: several of these trips and tours include a materials fee for admission and/or meals. This fee is non-refundable five business days prior to the start of the course. Directions and additional information about off-campus tours and trips are posted at www.hvcc.edu/communityed/courseinfo/.

A Visit to the Senate House - A State Historic Site in Kingston
As the British attacked New York in the summer of 1777, Kingston became the state's first capital, and the senate met in Abraham Van Gaasbeek's home. That October, the British attacked and burned the city, forcing the government and residents to flee. Today the site interprets the formation of New York state government and what life may have been like in Kingston in the 18th century. The site also has an art museum with the world's largest collection of art by Kingston native John Vanderlyn.
60503
$13
1 Session, Senate House State Historic Site
Wed., 3/18, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Senate House State Historic Site
Lea Darling, Coordinator

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Knickerbocker Family Mansion- Ghosts, Tour and Lunch
The Knickerbocker Historical Society will be our hosts as they tell us about the history of the Knickerbocker Mansion, which dates from about 1770. They will arrange for historical 'ghosts' to give moving first-hand accounts of their lives and experiences, and they will explain the renovations. The not-for-profit Society rescued the mansion from certain demolition and has continued to restore it. Our visit concludes with a chance to tour the mansion and to a colonial lunch cooked with authentic recipes, a delicious side to the history of the mansion! Course fee includes a $25 materials fee.
60018
$35
1 Session, Meeting at the Knickerbocker Family Mansion
Wed., 5/20, 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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The Saugerties Lighthouse
Join us at the Saugerties Lighthouse, an 1869 landmark on the Hudson River that now stands proudly as a living museum and a renowned bed and breakfast. Step back in time over a hundred years to experience the charm and rustic simplicity of life in the middle of the river. The Saugerties Lighthouse Conservancy maintains the lighthouse and adjacent lands for the enjoyment of the public.

The restored, red-brick lighthouse offers overnight bed and breakfast accommodations, public tours and special events. Furnished as it may have looked in the early 20th century, the lighthouse contains a small museum, gift shop, parlor, kitchen, keepers' quarters, and two guest bedrooms. The operational light-tower offers a panoramic view of the Hudson River Valley and Catskill Mountains. Because of its location on the river, tours must be scheduled with tide schedules in mind. The lighthouse can be reached via a half-mile nature trail of dirt and rock paths with wooden bridges and boardwalks and sandy trails. It is at the end of Lighthouse Drive in the village of Saugerties, New York. Suitable, comfortable shoes are recommended. Course fee includes a $8 materials fee.
60470
$18
1 Session, Meet at the lighthouse, Saugerties, NY
Thur., 4/23, Noon - 1:30 p.m.
Cynthia Serbent, Coordinator

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A Walk Among the Roses in the Yaddo Gardens
The Yaddo rose tour is a one and a half hour docent-led walking tour through the Yaddo gardens in Saratoga Springs. Yaddo is a working artists' community where creative artists pursue individual and collaborative projects in a supportive environment. Spencer Trask designed the Yaddo Gardens in 1899 as a gift of love to his wife, Katrina.

Tour participants are invited to experience the smells and colors of these beautiful rose gardens. Some say they can feel the energy and creativity of the forces of the Earth and share in the spiritual intrigue from Native Americans, Edgar Allan Poe, the Trask family and other contemporary Yaddo artist visitors. Come see what keeps the mystique surrounding the 400-acre estate at Yaddo alive.
60502
$20
1 Session, Yaddo Gardens
Tues., 6/23, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Vera Weiss, Coordinator

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Learn to Play Pool
Do you have a hidden urge to be a pool shark? Did you always want to play as a kid and never hand the chance? Well, this is the class for you! Rocco Spinelli, Jr., has offered us a wonderful opportunity to have lessons and practice at his family's Golden Cue Billiard Lounge. He will even throw in the pizza.

This 20-table pool hall has a two-generation family history but they are well prepared to take on our Creative Retirement crowd. And when you are there… look for the original Table No. 23, because it is something of a shrine. That's where Minnesota Fats shot nine ball in an exhibition in 1968. Course fee includes a $30 materials fee.
60533
$40
3 Sessions, The Golden Cue Billiard Lounge
Tues, 4/21 - 5/5, 1 - 3 p.m.
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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Visit Historic Grant Cottage and Have Tea
Ulysses S. Grant, hero of the Civil War and 18th President of the United States, died at Grant Cottage, in the town of Wilton, on July 23, 1885. The general was broke and dying of cancer; literally, racing death to finish his memoirs, the sales of which he hoped would rescue his family from poverty. When the clock on the mantel was stopped at 8:08 a.m., the hour and minute of Grant's passing, time itself stopped within Grant Cottage. The rooms and their furnishings are as they were the same morning of Grant's death.

In addition to touring the cottage and hearing about the general's tragic but ultimately triumphant final year, little-know and fascinating stores about U.S. Grant will be shared. You will also learn about "supporting players" in the Grant drama. Among them, Sam Willett, the Union veteran from Argyle, NY, who became the general's bodyguard; Charles Wood, the businessman from Troy who intervened at a critical moment to save the Grant family; Grant's African American valet, Harrison Terrell, a former slave; Simon Bolivar Buckner, a former Confederate general; and granddaughter, Julia, who would grow up to become a Russian princess and write her own memoir. Grant Cottage is full of marvelous, unexpected and sometimes improbable – but true! – tales. Tour guide Steve Trimm will share all of them with you.

Participants will enjoy a small tea and assorted sandwiches before their tour of the cottage. We may even have a secret family member of Grant's with us to share more stories of the illustrious President U.S Grant. This is a two-hour program with some standing and walking. Please wear comfortable shoes. We will meet at the Grant Cottage Visitor's Center to begin our tour. Course fee includes a $13 materials fee.
60457
$23
1 Session, Grant's Cottage Visitor's Center
Mon., 5/18, 10 a.m. - Noon
Lea Darling, Coordinator

Registration Information

60458
$23
1 Session, Grant's Cottage Visitor's Center
Mon., 5/18 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Lea Darling, Coordinator

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Spring Sensations - Exploring Nearby Nature Preserves
As the snow melts and the ground thaws, nature springs to life and puts on a glorious display. The spring palate includes a bounty of wildflowers like trillium, dog toothed violets, and lady slippers. An upward glance reveals the flowering shadblow and cherry. The first class at the college is really important and will include preparation, along with a presentation illustrating what we might see. In the following weeks, we will explore four of our favorite local preserves taking time to observe, learn about and enjoy the plants, wildlife and natural beauty around us.
60023
$10
5 Sessions,
Fri., 4/17, 10 a.m. - Noon, WIL 113
Fri., 4/24 - 5/15, 10 a.m. - Noon, Selected Preserves
Betty and John Nickles, Instructors

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Calling All Baseball Fans to the Albany Institute of History and Art
The AIHA will be presenting three exhibitions celebrating our passion for baseball. "Baseball: America's Game," is a travelling exhibition organized by the Bank of America. Drawn from their collection of nationally significant baseball materials, this multimedia exhibition features more than 90 photographs, illustrations, objects and audio and video programs that bring to life the history of the American sport.

"Play Ball" will highlight the rich history of baseball in the Capital Region and includes materials from the Institute's collection as well as loans from community members and public collections. From beloved pitcher Meldon Wolfgang to memories of Bleecker Stadium and the Albany Senators, visitors will discover our region's deeply rooted love of baseball.

"The Locker Room" is another community-based exhibition borrowed entirely from area collectors and is designed to highlight memories and memorabilia from baseball teams from coast to coast. Includes $8 materials fee.
60483
$18
1 Session, Meeting at AIHA
Tues., 3/24, 10 a.m. - Noon
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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A Tour of Proctor's Theatre in Schenectady
Come join us for a complete tour of Proctor's Theater. Our presentation will include the fascinating history of both the theater and the man who built it, Fredrick F. Proctor. Beginning in the arcade, visitors will be able to view a new exhibit that features Mr. Proctor from his teen years as a high wire performer to the owner of over 50 theaters across the country.

After listening to the history, a walking tour will begin and feature the stage, cross over area back stage, all the dressing rooms, mezzanine, balcony and theater museum. Many of these theater areas have just been newly cleaned and restored to their former beauty with years of dirt, tobacco tar and stains removed and new gilding carefully applied to match the original gold leaf.
60464
$10
1 Session, Proctor's Theatre
Tues., 4/7, 10:30 a.m. - Noon
Jean Chenette, Coordinator
Must register by 4/2/15.

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Tour and Lunch at The Skene Manor
Enjoy a visit to The Skene Manor, Whitehall's Castle on the Mountain, which is one of the few remaining castles in northeast New York. The castle was constructed of stone blocks cut right out of the mountain that frames the manor. This magnificent structure shows turn-of-the-century craftsmanship rarely duplicated today. Our morning will begin with a tour of the Skene Manor where we will experience the grandeur that exemplified turn-of-the-century wealth. Then, a lunch of homemade soup, sandwiches, beverages and dessert will be served in the tea room. You will be contacted prior to the trip for your sandwich order. All who visit rave about the lunch and the dedication of the volunteer staff who run the manor. Now, experience it for yourself! Course fee includes a $20 materials fee.
60032
$30
1 Session, The Skene Manor
Thurs., 4/23, 11:15 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

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Ukrainian Eggs, Pysanky Eggs
This is a fun, new craft to try! Well, it may be new to you but is a long tradition to many others. Create one neat hole in the egg. No more blowing! Then you will learn how to use a traditional wax tool called a kistka to"draw" with wax on your egg. Using layers of wax and brightly-colored dyes, you will create intricate designs on your egg. The final step is so exciting! You melt off the wax and reveal the many beautiful colors hiding below. This may sound difficult, but it is not. Even children who scratch squiggly lines on their eggs end up with bright and beautiful results. Course fee includes a $15 materials fee.
60046
$25
1 Session, The Albany Art Room
Wed., 4/1, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Karen Schupack, Instructor

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A Tour of the Melville House with the Lansingburgh Historical Society
Melville House was built in 1786 by Stephan Gorham, the first postmaster of Rensselaer County. A New York State historic marker commemorates the nine years that author Herman Melville lived there and wrote his first two novels, "Typee" and "Omoo." Melville was a graduate of the The Lansingburgh Academy and taught in the area. The Lansingburgh Historical Society's collections, housed at the site, include maps, photographs, diaries, business records, town and village records, and the Burleigh panoramic views. The unique "attic museum" houses tools, materials and products of the community's extensive 19th century brush and oil cloth industries.

The tour consists of a review of the history of Melville House and Lansingburgh. We will talk a little about the significance of the Lansing family, Herman Melville's times in the area, other important 'Burgh people, the Village Burying Ground and Old Catholic Burying Ground, Lansingburgh industries, and related information. The museum is in the attic of the building and has two rather long steep flights of stairs. Persons with walking difficulty may choose not to see the upstairs museum. Most of the talk will be in the public area on the first floor.
60459
$15
1 Session, Herman Melville House
Tues., 5/12, 10 a.m. - Noon
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

Registration Information

Spring Tour of Washington Park and its Historic Homes
Enjoy budding leaves as we take a step back in time to the mid-1800's to see and experience the genteel living of the nouveau rich of Troy's Washington Park and surrounding neighborhoods. You will be able to see first-hand, the loving care taken to rehabilitate and update many of these one of a kind homes of the emerging upper middle class of the 19th century and visit their own private park. You will see many different types of architecture including Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, Italianate and Queen Anne. We may even see a restoration in progress at one of the area homes. A small reception will be held in one of the tour stops.

Washington Park is described in an 1840's deed as a "private ornamental park for the use and recreation of the lots fronting said park." Owners would be charged for "fencing, improving, ornamentation, planting, keeping, and maintaining said park and the walks and streets around the same."

Today, surrounding homeowners still are assessed an annual maintenance fee for improvements and the upkeep of the grounds and fence. We will be visiting some new homes to keep it fresh and interesting. You never know what you will see.

There will be lots of walking on mostly uneven surfaces: sidewalks, grass, roads, and some home interiors with multiple flights of stairs, climbing up and down. Be mindful of your capabilities to keep up with the group as we have a tight schedule to adhere to for the 2-1/2 hour tour. Wear comfortable walking shoes as you will be on your feet for all of the tour but do join us for this delightful glimpse into an era of long ago.

Meet inside Washington Park. Park gate is in front of 195 2nd Street.

Parking is along the bordering streets of Washington Park - Washington Place, 2nd and 3rd Streets and Washington Street. Course fee includes a $10 materials fee.
60460
$20
1 Session, Washington Park
Tues., 5/19, 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Lea Darling, Coordinator

Registration Information

60461
$20
1 Session, Washington Park
Tues., 5/19, 1 - 3:30 p.m.
Lea Darling, Coordinator

Registration Information

NEW!
Matinee Theatre Players

Do you love theater? Have time in the afternoon? Like to keep your acting skills current? You may be interested in the Sand Lake Center for the Arts Matinee Theatre Players. The group is facilitated by Val Kavanaugh, but what they do is decided by its members. They may produce a show composed of favorite scenes, perform a staged reading, a one act play festival, a full length production or an evening of improv - the possibilities are all there! Come get in on the action! The first session is Tues., March 10 and performers will meet on consecutive Tuesdays until the production is complete.
60544
$10
Sand Lake Center for the Arts
Tues., 3/10, 1 - 3 p.m.
Val Kavanaugh, Facilitator

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New York City Bus Trip
A bus will leave at 7 a.m. from Crossgates Commons (behind Wal-Mart) for New York City. The bus will drop you off and pick you up from the Bryant Park area in Manhattan, leaving New York City at 7 p.m. The outing is for the bus trip only. Arrangements for the day will be left open for you to do whatever you please. A small donation will be collected on the bus for driver gratuity. Course fee includes a $29 materials fee.
60037
$40
1 Session, Leaving from parking lot behind Crossgates Commons
Wed., 5/20, 7 a.m. departure
Joyce Feiring, Coordinator

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Schenectady Culinary Luncheon
Join for us a delectable luncheon at the Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism Department at Schenectady County Community College. The menu will be designed by the Quantitative Foods lab instructor and class. If you prefer a vegetarian entree, please notify us at the time of registration. We will be treated to a tour of the facilities at 11:30 and lunch will be served at approximately noon. Course fee includes a $21 materials fee.
60038
$31
1 Session, Schenectady County Community College
Fri., 3/13, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Joyce Feiring, Coordinator

Registration Information

NEW!
An Overview of Banjo Making

Come visit with Ken Evans and a few banjomen at the Northeastern Woodworker's Association (NWA) shop in Clifton Park, to hear some banjo building history and see and hear how banjos are built today. This is the only place in the USA where students build all the wooden parts of a banjo, marry these parts to a large number of metal parts and make a beautiful musical instrument. Don't miss the opportunity to hang out in the shop, see and discuss the processes involved in turning rough wood into a rim, a neck, and a resonator and then to combine these parts to create what has been call the quintessential American instrument.
60546
$10
1 Session, 15 Solar Drive in Clifton Park, NY
Mon., 5/11, 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Ken Evans, Instructor

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NEW!
Bread Baking with High School Culinary Arts Students

Career and Technical Education (CTE) is the 21st century version of "votec" or "vocational programs." CTE programs offer high school students the opportunity to learn valuable career skills while still earning their Regents diploma. The half-day programs help students develop industry-specific skills, practice team work and problem solving and offer opportunities for internships with local businesses. Students graduating from CTE programs earn technical certifications that prepare them for college and careers.

One of the most popular CTE programs is Culinary Arts. The Culinary Arts program teaches students the management and culinary skills needed for a career in the hospitality and food service industries. This includes classroom study, lab work and mentored work experiences. The curriculum is based on ProStart, supported by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation.

During our morning visit, you will have the opportunity to learn bread baking from our talented high school seniors. The students will lead the session from start to finish and all participants will leave with a loaf of homemade goodness. While the dough's rising, students will interact with participants, share their career goals and aspirations and present their professional portfolios. We welcome the opportunity for our students to have an authentic audience from the community. Participants will make bread and bring home the loaf they created.
60547
$10
1 Session, Rensselaer Educational Center
Wed., 4/29, 9 a.m. - Noon
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

Registration Information

NEW!
Geocaching

Get ready for a high-tech treasure hunt near you! All you need is a device with GPS capabilities (smartphone or hand-held GPS receiver), connection to the internet and a desire to get outside and to have some fun.

Marv and Vera Weiss have been geocaching since 2003 and have discovered over 3700 geocaches of all types in 39 countries on all seven continents. They are happy to show you what's involved with geocaching and how to get started.

Bring your GPS or a device with a GPS to the class. We will have hidden some caches outside the building and will take you on a couple of cache hunts. If it is raining that day, be sure to bring an umbrella as well.
60548
$10
1 Session, WIL 113
Mon., 5/4, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Marv and Vera Weiss, Instructors

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Spring Wildflowers: Folklore and Uses
It is fascinating to learn how plants got their names and how they were used in traditional cultures. Identify and explore the folklore of spring wildflowers on a leisurely walk along Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center's trails. Course fee includes a $5 materials fee.
60553
$15
1 Session, Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center
Thurs., 5/21, 1 - 3 p.m.
Lisa Hoyt, Instructor
Cynthia Serbent, Coordinator

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Sounds of Spring Twilight Walk
Spring is a wonderful time to look and listen for animals as they shake off winter and become more active. Listen to the sounds of crepuscular creatures as we take a leisurely twilight walk along the trails at the Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center. We'll be listening for the wonderful sounds of spring peepers (frogs), barred owls and other calls of the night. We will cover about 1.5 mile of easy walking. Course fee includes a $5 materials fee.
60554
$15
1 Session, Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center
Thurs., 4/30, 6 - 8 p.m.
Lisa Hoyt, Instructor
Kathy Sullivan, Coordinator

Registration Information

NEW!
Beginner Birding

Bird watching is a rewarding activity that can be done in the far reaches of the world or from the comfort of your living room. Let's start at the beginning and learn necessary skills needed to become a birder. It's an activity you will enjoy for the rest of your life. We'll cover binoculars, basic field identification marks, habitats and songs. Field guides and mobile apps will also be covered. When you leave this class, you will be able to identify at least ten birds by sight and sound. Course fee includes a $5 materials fee.
60506
$15
1 Session, Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center
Mon., 6/15, 8 - 10 a.m.
Lisa Hoyt, Instructor
Jean Chenette, Coordinator

Registration Information

NEW!
Slate Valley Museum and Quarry Visit

The Slate Valley Museum explores, preserves, and celebrates the history and heritage of the Slate Valley, a 30-mile long and six-mile wide area along the New York-Vermont border where slate rock has been quarried since 1850. The museum's exhibits explore the social and cultural history of immigrants who came to work in the slate industry, the evolution of the pivotal tools and technologies that have molded the industry throughout its history, and the geological formation of slate and the valley.

Through this program, participants will explore this rich cultural, industrial and geological story through a guided tour of the museum. The group will then drive to a nearby slate quarry, where they will experience a tour of modern slate industry facilities led by slate workers. Since the tour will take place in an industrial, commercial environment, boots are recommended and open-toed shoes are not permitted. Those with mobility issues will be able to see some of the quarry from their car, but walks into the quarry will be on unpaved, dirt roads used for heavy lifting equipment, so please plan accordingly. Please do not wear open-toed shoes.
60480
$10
1 Session, Slate Valley Museum
Wed., 5/20, 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Lea Darling, Coordinator

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OUT AND ABOUT

This year's program reflects the diversity to be found in the mid-Hudson region. Our visits include a lighthouse on the Hudson, farms in Washington County, a view of our Dutch Colonial history in Ulster County, a look at our aristocratic heritage in Columbia County, a tour of an Albany distillery, and a ghost tour presentation in Clifton Park.

Thursday, May 21 - Early Orientation at Hudson Valley Community College then a Dutch Colonial heritage day to begin in Hurley, NY and then on to Kingston, NY.

After a brief orientation meeting at the college to distribute information and to allow time for those who wish to arrange for carpooling, we will proceed to Hurley. We will have a guided tour of that community's historic Main Street to include the cemetery, followed by a tour of two private Dutch colonial homes, and a visit to the museum. In the afternoon, we will meet in Kingston for a brief walk to the Kingston Senate building where our guide will focus on Kingston's Dutch colonial heritage.

Thursday, May 28 - Albany Distilling Co., and the Ghosts of Albany Walking Tour
We begin the day with a guided tour of the distillery which is located close to the original 18th century distillery in downtown Albany. We then proceed to the Powers Inn in Clifton Park for an impressive indoor presentation about the ghosts of Albany.

Thursday, June 4 - Washington County cheese tour at three sites to include a farm lunch and a local ice cream dessert, and we'll then stop at a 19th century covered bridge.
Our first stop is the Argyle Cheese Farmer and we will see Ricotta cheese being produced. We will then proceed to a farm-to-table lunch at Gardenworks, and then on to the Battenkill Valley Creamery for ice cream. We will end at the historic Rexleigh Covered Bridge.

Thursday, June 11 - We will tour the Athens-Hudson Lighthouse followed by a tour of the Livingston Manor house and gardens at the Clermont State Historic Site in Germantown. We will meet at the departure pier in the Henry Hudson Waterfront Park in Hudson for a 15-minute ferry ride to the Athens-Hudson Lighthouse where we will be able to tour the lighthouse. In the afternoon, we will meet at the Clermont State Historic Site in Germantown for guided tours of the Robert Livingston Manor and gardens.
60080
$109
Thurs., 5/21 8:30 - 9 a.m., Orientation, WIL 113
Thurs., 5/21 - 6/11, Out and About Sites
Judy Beiss and Fran Krause, Coordinators

Registration Information