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04/14/2003
Did We Really Win the War? Veteran Journalist and War Correspondent Don Wilcock Debates War in a Free Society Then and Now, Vietnam vs. Iraq

CONTACT: Steve Mullen (518) 629-8063 or Don Wilcock (518) 347-1751
FOR RELEASE: Immediate, Monday, April 14, 2003

What's it like to be a reporter in a war zone? Did we really win the war, and will we win the peace? These are some of the questions Vietnam War veteran and former war correspondent Don Wilcock addresses in his presentation "Reporting on War in a Free Society Then and Now, Vietnam vs. Iraq." His address will be followed by a question-and-answer period on Wednesday, April 23 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. in the Hudson Valley Community College's Bulmer Telecommunications Center auditorium.

Following each discussion, Hudson Valley will show the film "Good Morning Vietnam," starring Robin Williams. Admission is free.

Saddam Hussein's monuments to himself have been toppled, and the coalition forces have taken control of Iraq, but what comes next, and do we have an accurate picture of the situation? These are just some of the questions veteran journalist Don Wilcock attempts to answer in this timely public forum.

Wilcock was assigned to the U.S. Army Headquarters Vietnam Information Office in 1969. As an Army information specialist he edited World News Roundup, the daily newspaper for more than 30,000 troops from generals to privates stationed in Long Binh, Vietnam. He went on to become Publications Director for General Electric where he edited several magazines and newspapers that presented GE's image to the world. He is the author of the highly acclaimed biography of four-time Grammy winning musician Buddy Guy, and his articles on pop culture have appeared in magazines worldwide ranging from "Rolling Stone" and "Billboard" to "Audiophile Voice" and "Living Blues." Wilcock currently is Editor of "King Biscuit Time Magazine," the journal of the Peabody Award-winning radio show of the same name that has been the voice of blues since 1941. Wilcock also is president of the Northeast Blues Society and the music writer for The Record in Troy.

Wilcock will offer an informed perspective on how journalists handle war then and now, the role technology has played in changing war's image in the public's mind and how propaganda manipulates our attitudes toward the war effort. He will discuss how Jessica Lynch, an Army private, became more important than the views of five-star generals, as well as the advantages – and disadvantages – of a free press in wartime.

Hudson Valley Community College, located at 80 Vandenburgh Avenue in Troy, offers more than 50 degree and certificate programs in four academic divisions: Business; Engineering and Industrial Technologies; Health Science; and Liberal Arts and Sciences; and an Educational Opportunity Center for academic and career training. One of 30 community colleges in the State University of New York system, it has an enrollment of more than 11,000 students each year, and is known as a leader in distance learning initiatives and workforce training.