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01/21/2003
Hudson Valley Sends Five Lucky Students To Ireland

CONTACT: Jeff Foley (518) 629-8085
FOR RELEASE: Immediate, Tuesday, January 21, 2003

Image of (L to R) Thomas Lansing, Nathan Snow, Katie Lasky, Philip Weinman and Alexander Boyce.Five Hudson Valley Community College students and Capital Region residents recently found out they have the "luck o' the Irish." Thanks to two study-abroad programs, both of which are offered through Hudson Valley's affiliation with the College Consortium of International Studies, the following students are spending the spring 2003 term in Ireland: Alexander Boyce of Glenville; Thomas Lansing of Wynantskill; Katie Lasky of Troy; Nathan Snow of Burnt Hills; and Philip Weinman of Albany.

Boyce, Lasky and Weinman will leave on February 3 to study at the University of Limerick, which is located on the banks of the Shannon River and enjoys a national reputation for its Business, Engineering, Education and Humanities programs. The program at the University of Limerick will conclude in late May.

Lansing and Snow, meanwhile, left on January 9 to study at Maynooth College, which is about 15 miles from the center of Dublin in County Kildare. Maynooth College provides students with a comprehensive overview of the development and history of Irish society, culture, literature and the arts. Lansing and Snow's program will conclude in early May.

"I spoke to each of the students recently, and they're excited for different reasons," said Amy Gumaer, director of International Programs at Hudson Valley. "Alex Boyce is excited about meeting new people and experiencing a completely new culture. Philip Weinman spoke about how the program will help him become a history professor or a political analyst. Katie Lasky is looking forward to spending time with cousins who live in Limerick and taking ecology courses. Thomas Lansing was enthusiastic about getting in touch with his Irish roots and meeting relatives who live in Galway. And Nathan Snow talked about his plans to become an English teacher; he felt that studying in Ireland will expand his understanding of European and Irish literature."

For all of the students except Boyce, this Ireland trip marks their first time overseas. Boyce, Weinman and Snow plan to hook up for another international adventure when their study abroad programs conclude in May. The trio is planning to purchase Interrail passes and backpack across Europe before returning to the United States.

Students interested in taking advantage of Hudson Valley's study abroad programs should contact Amy Gumaer at gumaeamy@hvcc.edu. They also can visit her in Hudson Valley's Language Lab office, which is located in room 112 of Brahan Hall.

Founded in 1953, Hudson Valley Community College offers more than 50 degree and certification programs in four academic divisions: Liberal Arts and Sciences; Engineering and Industrial Technologies; Health Sciences; and Business; as well as programs run through the Educational Opportunity Center offering certification programs in workforce and academic preparation. One of 30 community colleges in the State University of New York system, it has an enrollment of more than 11,000 students, and it is known as a leader in distance learning initiatives and worker retraining. Hudson Valley has graduated more than 55,000 students.