Cultural Affairs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Upcoming Events

The Transformative Power of Education in the Prison Setting
Tuesday, March 3, 2015
11:00 am – 11:50 am
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison was founded in 1998 with the mission to provide college education, life skills and re-entry support to incarcerated men and women. Emily Patka, the academic coordinator for Hudson Link’s college program at Greene Correctional Facility, discusses Hudson Link’s unique model, the transformative power of education and the importance of offering educational opportunities in prisons. A panel of Hudson Valley Community College Criminal Justice students explores the issue of educating prison inmates in a question and answer discussion with Patka.

 

Slavery by Another Name Full Film Screening
Tuesday, March 3, 2015
11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Maureen Stapleton Theatre in the Siek Campus Center

Attend a full screening of Slavery By Another Name, the 2012 documentary that tells the story of Southern black men, charged with minor crimes and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold as unpaid convict labor, a practice begun after the Emancipation Proclamation and lasting into the twentieth century. Popcorn and giveaways for Hudson Valley Community College students provided by the Student Activities Office.

The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and moderated screenings of these films this spring and next fall at locations on and off campus. For details about this series, go to www.hvcc.edu/created-equal.
All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret
Tuesday, March 3, 2015
6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Maureen Stapleton Theatre in Siek Campus Center

The film, Cowspiracy, exposes animal agriculture as the leading cause of deforestation, water consumption and pollution, generating more greenhouse gases than the transportation industry. Kathy Stevens, founder and director of the Catskill Animal Sanctuary, is guest speaker.

Free and open to the public.

“Cowspiracy may be the most important film made to inspire saving the planet.”
- Louis Psihoyos, Oscar-Winning Director of “The Cove”

Sponsored by the Animal Outreach Club at Hudson Valley Community College and New York State Humane Association

 

Slavery by Another Name Film Screening (with moderated discussion)
Thursday, March 5, 2015
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
First United Presbyterian Church, Troy

Join a moderated discussion of themes of Slavery by Another Name shown in excerpted form. Moderated by Tamu Chambers, Carmine Pesca and Roy Pompey.

Professor Carmine Pesca, Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Public Administration at Hudson Valley Community College, joins Professor Tamu Chambers,  History, Philosophy and Social Sciences Department and Roy Pompey, coordinator of the college’s Collegiate Academic Support Program (CASP),  highlight the major points of the film and lead audience members in a related discussion.

Chambers regularly teaches sociology courses and holds advisory positions in numerous organizations. Pompey is a recognized leader in fostering college success among African American students in the Capital Region. In addition to teaching Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Introduction to Criminal Justice, Pesca is a member of the Criminal Justice Educators Association of New York (CJEANYS).

The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and moderated screenings of these films this spring and next fall at locations on and off campus. For details about this series, go to www.hvcc.edu/created-equal.
All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Slavery by Another Name Film Screening (with moderated discussion)
Wednesday, March 11, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Marvin Library Learning Commons, Multipurpose Room

Join a moderated discussion of themes of Slavery by Another Name shown in excerpted form. Moderated by Tamu Chambers, Carmine Pesca and Roy Pompey.

Professor Carmine Pesca, Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Public Administration at Hudson Valley Community College, joins Professor Tamu Chambers,  History, Philosophy and Social Sciences Department and Roy Pompey, coordinator of the college’s Collegiate Academic Support Program (CASP),  highlight the major points of the film and lead audience members in a related discussion.

Chambers regularly teaches sociology courses and holds advisory positions in numerous organizations. Pompey is a recognized leader in fostering college success among African American students in the Capital Region. In addition to teaching Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Introduction to Criminal Justice, Pesca is a member of the Criminal Justice Educators Association of New York (CJEANYS).

The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and moderated screenings of these films this spring and next fall at locations on and off campus. For details about this series, go to www.hvcc.edu/created-equal.
All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

A Wild Life: Author Cheryl Strayed
Thursday, March 12, 2015
7:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Author Cheryl Strayed

Photo by Joni Kabana

Cheryl Strayed reads from and discusses her New York Times bestselling memoir, “Wild,” the story of her solo, 1000-mile hike on the Pacific Crest Trail in order to put her life back together following her mother’s death, a divorce and her slide into a risky lifestyle that included heroin use. “Wild” has been made into a movie, released in late 2014, starring Reese Witherspoon and directed by Jean-Marc Vallee.

Free and open to the public.  Seating is limited and on a first-come basis. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

 

Reflection on Themes from the Created Equal Film Series
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
2:00 pm – 2:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Presented by Dr. Oscar R. Williams

An associate professor and chair of the Africana Studies Department at the University at Albany, Dr. Williams is a notable scholar on African American issues.

The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and moderated screenings of these films this spring and next fall at locations on and off campus. For details about this series, go to www.hvcc.edu/created-equal.
All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Individual and Community Struggles with Narcotics in New York State
Thursday, March 19, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Patrick J. Hogan, investigator with the New York State Police and a Hudson Valley Community College alumnus, speaks about Community Narcotics Enforcement Teams (CNET) and the impact of short-term vs. long-range planning on the community. Hogan examines how all the choices we make in our daily lives are interrelated and link our individual actions to the community as a whole.

 

Riverstone Quintet
Friday, March 20, 2015
12:00 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Riverstone QuintetAn emerging chamber music ensemble based in upstate NY, Riverstone Quintet, performs classical music from baroque to contemporary. An intriguing blend of instruments – flute, oboe, cello and harp – lends itself to a unique listening opportunity.

Free and open to the public.

 

Documentary Storytelling and Slavery by Another Name: A Case Study
Wednesday, March 25, 2015
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Presented by Professor Sheila Curran Bernard

What’s involved in writing a 90-minute, theatrical documentary based on a 400-page, Pulitzer Prize-winning book? How do filmmakers collaborate to ensure a work’s value not only for broadcast, but also for classroom and community use, including an initiative such as Created Equal? Sheila Curran Bernard, the film’s writer and an associate professor of history and documentary studies at the University at Albany, leads this 50-minute discussion. An Emmy and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker, Curran Bernard is the author of “Documentary Storytelling,” now in its fourth edition.

The Dwight Marvin Library at Hudson Valley Community College hosts Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a series of presentations by leading civil rights scholars and moderated screenings of these films this spring and next fall at locations on and off campus. For details about this series, go to www.hvcc.edu/created-equal.
All events are open to students, staff and faculty at Hudson Valley, as well as the general public, free of charge.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

Taikoza, Japanese Taiko drums and bamboo flutes
Saturday, April 11, 2015
12:00 pm
Maureen Stapleton Theatre in Siek Campus Center

TaikozaDrawing from Japan’s rich tradition of music and performance, Taikoza brings the thunderous rhythms of ancestral Japanese Taiko drums and the magical sounds of bamboo flutes to the stage for a highly visual performance, accented by colorful traditional costumes. Taikoza is led by internationally known Shakuhachi and Taiko Master Marco Lienhard. More at www.taikoza.com.

Tickets: $10 for the general public; free for children under 12; free for Hudson Valley students, faculty and staff.

 

Growing an Idea: Mushroom Packaging and Beyond
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Sue Van Hook, chief mycologist for Ecovative, an international company based in Green Island, discusses the growth of a student entrepreneurial idea conceived at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Evocative developed an innovative way to turn backyard fungi into a biodegradable material that can be used as a responsible alternative to packaging and insulation.

 

Juried Student Art Exhibit and Advanced Study in Drawing and Painting End-of-Year Exhibit Opening Reception and Department Awards
Friday, April 17, 2015
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Teaching Gallery, located in Administration Building

Showcasing a year of work by students in the college’s Fine Arts program, these exhibits were organized by students in Gallery Management classes. The opening reception is celebrated with an awards ceremony, at which three cash prizes are presented.

 

TC Boyle: Author Reading
Friday, April 24, 2015
11:00 am
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Boyle-TC

Photo by Milo Boyle

New York Times bestselling author TC Boyle reads from his recent novel, “The Harder They Come,” an exploration of the roots of violence and antiauthoritarianism in America. Boyle authored more than 24 works of fiction and has received numerous literary awards, including the Pen Faulkner Prize for the best novel (“World’s End,” 1998).

Free and open to the public. Seating is limited and on a first-come basis. Doors open at 10:15 a.m.

Presented by the Cultural Affairs Program in association with the Department of English, Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language.

 

Invasive Species – Coming to a Community Near You
Thursday, April 30, 2015
11:00 am – 11:50 am
Bulmer Telecommunications Center Auditorium

Laurel R. Gailor, coordinator of the Mohawk Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM), provides a general overview of invasive species in the Capital/Mohawk Region. Information will include updates from research institutes and the Invasive Species Council, as well as a summary of citizen participatory activities, including IMapInvasives, science projects, internships and other research projects.