Academic Advisement
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Academic Advisement Guide

Step One: Print Your Advising Worksheets Here

Other Resources Online:

Instructional Calendar

Biology Study Center

Center for Academic Engagement

Center for Careers and Employment

Center for Counseling and Transfer

Learning Centers

Learning Assistance Center

Computer Learning Center

Writing and Research Center

Collegiate Academic Support Program

Online Learning

Services for Students with Disabilities

Learning Disabilities Services

 

About Academic Advising

Advisement Tips and Checklist

Department Contact Guide

Advisement Terms/Glossary

Interpreting Your Test Results

Developmental Courses

ESL Developmental Courses

Learning Assistance Center Courses

Please be advised that the information, policies and procedures detailed on this Web page are subject to change at the discretion of Hudson Valley Community College.

Hudson Valley Community College, sponsored by Rensselaer County, part of the State University of New York, does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, race or ethnicity, national origin, religion, disabling condition, marital status or sexual orientation.

 

 


Academic Advising

Academic advising is a continual process of communication and information exchange between advisors and students. It is designed to help students achieve their educational goals.

The advisor/advisee relationship is based on shared responsibility: the advisor is the teacher and facilitator, and the student is the active participant and decision-maker. Academic advising is designed to foster in the student:

  • Establishment of goals in academic, career and personal development areas

  • Knowledge of the academic programs, academic policies and educational resources at Hudson Valley Community College

  • Skill in the process of decision making

  • A high degree of self-direction

Advisor Responsibilities:

  • Helps students define and develop realistic educational and career goals in keeping with their abilities, limitations and interests

  • Aids students with course selection and scheduling, taking into consideration academic background, placement test results, and non–academic factors such as career plans, family concerns/responsibilities, job commitments, etc.

  • Monitors students' progress toward educational/career goals

  • Helps resolve academic difficulties

  • Makes proper referrals to campus support services when a need is indicated directly or indirectly

  • Maintains a record for each advisee with information such as a summary of courses and requirements completed and interview sheets with dated records of all actions and discussions of significance

Advisee Responsibilities:

  • Schedules appointments with the advisor to discuss educational plans, course selection, academic progress and other concerns or questions

  • Keeps appointments, knowing that the advisor has a busy schedule

  • Is knowledgeable about policies, procedures, requirements and deadlines printed in the Student Handbook and College Catalog

  • Alerts the advisor immediately when difficulties in any classes or changes in personal life demand that adjustments be made in the current schedule or general educational plan

  • Keeps a record of program requirements and course work completed

  • Assumes responsibility for the paperwork necessary to withdraw from courses, change programs, prepare for graduation and plan for employment or transfer

  • Is familiar with key advising terms (see glossary)

  • Is an active participant in the advisement process

Advisement Tips

Locate your program and review the college catalog, major requirements and suggested course sequence for full-time study:

  • Full-time students generally register for 12 to 15 credits.
  • Part-time students generally register for 3 to 11 credits.

WIReD will allow you to review class offerings for the semester. Visit the "Students" link, located at the top of the Web page, and then click the WIReD logo, or go to www.hvcc.edu/wired.

To access this information, you must login to the system.
Your username and password were mailed to you around the time of your application.
If you forget your password or need to change it, please click on the "Help" button on the WIReD login screen.

  • After logging in, click Class Search from the menu.

  • On the next screen, Look-up Classes, under Search by Term: choose Spring if you are enrolling in January or Fall if you are enrolling in August. (Note: do not select a term with the phrase Credit-Free displayed.)

  • Choose your starting term from the drop down menu and click Submit.

  • Click the appropriate boxes under Look-Up Classes to create your search and click Class Search.

  • Become familiar with each column of information. Click on the Course Registration Number (CRN) to obtain additional information about specific courses. Look for pre-requisite (take before) or co-requisite (take with) designations when reading the course descriptions.

  • Make a "dream" schedule with the classes and times you want, using the online schedule. Be sure to write down the CRN for each course you want to take.

  • Write down any questions or concerns and bring those and your "dream" schedule with you when meeting your advisor.

Your advisor will assume that you have taken the following steps to prepare for your advisement meeting:

Reviewed the College Catalog for (check when completed):
______ Program requirements
______ Graduation requirements
______ Course descriptions: pay attention to pre- and co-requisites

Reviewed the online course schedule via WIReD (directions above):
______ Completed a tentative schedule, considering your preferred day/times for courses within your program (use inside cover of this guide).

Thought about questions or concerns you may want to discuss with your advisor, such as childcare, transportation, finances, job schedule, transfer options, career interest, etc.
______ Created a list of questions or concerns to bring to the meeting with my advisor.

Use WIReD regularly to view important information, including My Enrollment Steps Checklist, class schedule, grades, financial aid and tuition bill, both before and after you are enrolled.

Department Contact Numbers

Locate your department/program of study on the following list and call to schedule an appointment for advisement. If you took the placement test, you were provided with an information sheet from your department giving you further instructions; please refer to the sheet for additional information regarding advisement hours and availability. All areas of study are degree programs unless otherwise noted. All telephone numbers are in the 518 area code.

* Denotes the program can be completed online.

School of Business
Areas of Study Advisement Contact Building/Room Phone
*Accounting Degree or Certificate Business Advisement Center BRN 205 (518) 629-7148
*Administrative Information Management and Technology
*Business Administration
*Computer Information Systems (CIS)
CIS: System & Network Administration
*CIS: Web Design & WWW Programming
*Entrepreneurship
*Health Information Management and Technology
*Information Systems Certificate
*Marketing
 
School of Engineering and Industrial Technologies
Areas of Study Advisement Contact Building/Room Phone
Architectural Technology Degree or Certificate Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Automotive Management School of Technology Academic Advisement Center

Lang Technical Building, Rooms 105-106

(518) 629-8003
Automotive Technical Services (ATS)
ATS: Auto Body Repair
ATS: Chrysler
Civil Engineering Technology Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Computer Aided Drafting Certificate Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Construction – Building Construction Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Construction Certificate Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Electrical Construction & Maintenance School of Technology Academic Advisement Center Lang Technical Building, Rooms 105-106 (518) 629-8003
Electrical Engineering Technology—Electronics
Electrical Technology: Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology
Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Technical Services
Advanced Manufacturing Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology Dr. C. LaPlante HUD-129 (518) 629-7355
Overhead Electric Line Worker Certificate School of Technology Academic Advisement Center Lang Technical Building, Rooms 105-106 (518) 629-8003
Photovoltaic Installation Certificate
Semiconductor Technology Certificate
Telecommunications Technology-Verizon
Wind Technician Certificate
       
School of Health Sciences
Areas of Study Advisement Contact Building/Room Phone
Bereavement Studies Certificate Ms. E. Reinhard BRN-124 (518) 629-7113
*Dental Assisting Certificate Ms. J. Romano FTZ-157 (518) 629-7442
Ms. G. Hamm FTZ-127 (518) 629-7400
Dental Hygiene Ms. J. Romano FTZ-157 (518) 629-7442
Ms. G. Hamm FTZ-127 (518) 629-7400
Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate Ms. M. Ewart BRN-026 (518) 629-7123
Echocardiography Certificate Ms. M. Ewart BRN-026 (518) 629-7123
Emergency Medical Technician—Paramedic Degree Ms. D. Kufs JRD-205 (518) 629-7454
Emergency Medical Technician—Paramedic Certificate Ms. P. Hyland JRD-202 (518) 629-7454
Invasive Cardiovascular Technology Ms. P. Hyland JRD-202 (518) 629-7454
Mr. D. Teneyck JRD-201 (518) 629-7428
Mortuary Science Ms. E. Reinhard BRN-124 (518) 629-7113
Nursing (Full and Part-time) Dr. C. Bosco FTZ-204 (518) 629-7469
Polysomnography Ms. P. Hyland JRD-202 (518) 629-7454
Mr. D. Teneyck JRD-201 (518) 629-7428
Radiologic Technology Ms. M. Ewart BRN-026 (518) 629-7123
Respiratory Care Ms. P. Hyland JRD-202 (518) 629-7454
       
School of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Areas of Study Advisement Contact Building/Room Phone
Animal Advocacy Certificate Dr. A. Geisendorfer BTC-240 (518) 629-7342
Mr. H. Bancroft BTC-240 (518) 629-7491
Biological Sciences Dr. P. Schaefer FTZ-313 (518) 629-7453
Biotechnology Degree or Certificate Dr. P. Schaefer FTZ-313 (518) 629-7453
Broadcast Communications Ms. D. Reynolds BRN-124 (518) 629-7347
Chemical Dependency Counseling Mr. T. Adams BRN-008 (518) 629-7341
*Criminal Investigation Dr. A. Geisendorfer BTC-240 (518) 629-7342
Mr. H. Bancroft BTC-240 (518) 629-7491
*Criminal Justice Dr. A. Geisendorfer BTC-240 (518) 629-7342
Mr. H. Bancroft BTC-240 (518) 629-7491
Digital Media Certificate Ms. D. Reynolds BRN-124 (518) 629-7347
*Disabilities Studies Certificate Mr. T. Adams BRN-008 (518) 629-7341
Early Childhood Prof. N. Cupolo HGB-109 (518) 629-7250
Engineering Science Ms. S. Kutryb BTC-230 (518) 629-7358
Environmental Science Dr. P. Schaefer FTZ-313 (518) 629-7453
Fine Arts Ms. D. Reynolds BRN-124 (518) 629-7347
Forensic Science Studies Dr. A. Geisendorfer BTC-240 (518) 629-7342
Mr. H. Bancroft BTC-240 (518) 629-7491
Health Science Certificate Mr. B. Vlieg BRN-033/CTR-290 (518) 629-7219
Human Services Mr. T. Adams BRN-008 (518) 629-7341
*Individual Studies (INS) Mr. B. Vlieg BRN-033/CTR-290 (518) 629-7219
INS: 24-Credit Hour Program Ms. S. Garhart CTR-280 (518) 629-7188
*Liberal Arts (LAS): Humanities and Social Science Mr. J. Kennedy CTR-280 (518) 629-7191
LAS: Adolescence Education Mr. J. Kennedy CTR-280 (518) 629-7191
LAS: Honors—Humanities and Social Science Mr. J. Kennedy CTR-280 (518) 629-7191
LAS: Mathematics and Science Ms. S. Kutryb BTC-230 (518) 629-7358
LAS: Honors—Mathematics and Science Ms. S. Kutryb BTC-230 (518) 629-7358
Physical Education Studies Dr. J. Silvestri MCD-210 (518) 629-7370
  Mr. A. Blanchard MCD-221 (518) 629-7523
Physical Sciences Dr. P. Schaefer FTZ-313 (518) 629-7453
*Public Administration Studies Dr. A. Geisendorfer BTC-240 (518) 629-7342
Mr. H. Bancroft BTC-240 (518) 629-7491
*Teaching Assistant Certificate Prof. N. Cupolo HGB-109 (518) 629-7250
Theatre Arts Ms. D. Reynolds BRN-124 (518) 629-7347

Glossary of Advisement Terms

Add-Drop Period: The college allows students to change their schedules very early in the term, usually through the first week of classes. If you met with an advisor to select your courses, you may have to return to your advisor to substitute one course for another. If you are making a change from one course section to another that meets at a more convenient time or location, you can do that at the Registrar's Office in the Guenther Enrollment Services Center or through WIReD online if your advisor gave you an AVN (Advisement Number). After the add-drop period ends, you can only withdraw from classes, which may affect any financial aid you receive. Always double-check with your advisor before you withdraw from a course.

Advisor: An individual who provides academic advice. For matriculated students: the department chair (DC), an advisor in an advisement center, or a faculty member designated by the DC to advise students. For non-matriculated students: a counselor from the Office of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions.

Contact Hours: The total hours of class and lab required per week in a course.

Co-requisites: Two courses which must be taken during the same term.

Credit: A unit of academic award often applicable toward a degree or certificate, measured in term hours.

Department Chair: An individual in charge of a specific academic program.

Elective Course: A program requirement that a student may choose to take from a number of possible courses.

Enrolled Student: A student who has scheduled classes and met all payment requirements. (A student who schedules classes but does not complete the payment process will not be granted credit, regardless of class attendance.)

Full-Time Student: A student enrolled for 12 or more credits per term.

Grade Point Average: The numerical average based on the credit hours attempted and grades earned for courses taken at Hudson Valley. At the close of each term, a separate index is calculated to indicate the term average and the overall cumulative average.

Matriculated Student: A student who has been accepted for admission to the college, has registered in a program of study, and is pursuing courses toward a degree or certificate.

Non-Matriculated Student: A student who has not yet been accepted for admission to the college, has lost matriculated status by not enrolling in coursework for one term, or has been dismissed from a program because of failure to maintain good academic standing. Courses taken by a non-matriculated student may later count toward a degree; however, the student will not be eligible for financial aid.

Non-Degree Courses: Courses which prepare students for college-level study but are not applicable toward a degree and are designated "ND" in the course description.

Part-Time Student: A student enrolled for fewer than 12 credits per term.

Pre-requisite: A course that a student must successfully complete before enrolling in a related, usually higher-level course.

Program of Study (Major): A set of courses which awards a certificate or degree with a purpose such as preparing a student to enter the workforce immediately or to transfer to a degree program at another college.

Withdrawal: The Last Day to Withdraw from a class is your last chance to drop a class and not receive a grade of A-F. You must obtain written approval from an advisor or Department Chair in order to withdraw from a class. If you stop attending class, you will NOT be withdrawn until you submit the written approval to the Registrar's Office.

Interpreting Your Placement Recommendations

COMPASS and ASSET placement tests, designed by American College Testing (ACT), and the SkillsTutor assessment, designed by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, are used to assess students' basic skill levels in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Students waived from testing are assessed based upon the high school transcript and other available academic history information. Students, along with their academic advisor, will use the test scores and academic history information to choose the appropriate first semester courses. There are three categories in which a student may place, depending on the score or academic history in each area: Weak, Decision Zone, or Skills in Place.

Basic Skills: (Shaded rows in chart.)
The student is weak in that skill area and may need to take a developmental, non-credit course or regularly utilize campus support services.
Decision Zone:
The student is neither weak nor strong, but may need additional assistance to be successful in some college courses.
Skills in Place:
The student is ready for college-level work.

Mandatory Placement Policy – Applies to only Students taking the COMPASS or ASSET tests.
Hudson Valley does have a Mandatory Placement Policy: Students who test weak (below college level) in the three basic skills areas (Reading, Writing, and Math) will be required to register for at least one (1) appropriate learning skills course during their first term of full-time study or earlier.

Course Placement Recommendations
Use your test scores or academic history information to determine your course recommendations.

Waived Students   Tested Students
English 11 Course Recommendations - Writing Skills COMPASS ASSET SkillsTutor
0-69 Basic Skills: ENGL 092 - English Fundamentals plus
LRAC 093 - Writing OR
ESLS 092 (Fall), 093 (Spring) - Fundamentals of ESL I, II plus LRAC 093 - LAC Writing
0–28 23–34 0-54
70-79 Decision Zone: Writing Intensive Course plus
LRAC 093 - Writing
29–65 35–40 55-65
80-100 Skills in Place: College-level Writing Course 66–100 41–54 80-100
 
Waived Students   Tested Students
US History 11 Course Recommendations - Reading Skills COMPASS ASSET SkillsTutor
0-69 Basic Skills: LSKL 095 - Reading & Reasoning plus
LRAC 090 - LAC Reading/Study Skills OR
ESLS 094 - Reading for ESL I plus
LRAC 090 - Reading/Study Skills
0–77 23–38 0-69
70-79 Decision Zone: College-level Reading Course plus
LRAC 090 - Reading/Study Skills
78–91 39–45 70-80
80-100 Skills in Place: College-level Reading Course 92–100 46–53 80-100
 
Waived Students   Tested Students
Math 1 Course Recommendations - Math Skills COMPASS ASSET SkillsTutor
  Pre-Algebra      
N/A Basic Skills: MATH 095 - Basic Mathematics with Study Skills plus
LRAC 091- Math
0–28 23–33 0-69
  Algebra      
0-69 Basic Skills: MATH 099 - Elementary Algebra I plus
LRAC 091-Math OR
MATH 105* - Applied Technical Mathematics I plus
LRAC 091-Math
0–25 23–33 0-69
70-79 Decision Zone: MATH 105* - Applied Technical Mathematics I OR
Math 110 Intermediate Algebra or above plus
LRAC 091-Math
26–40 34–42 70-80
80-100 Skills in Place: MATH 105* - Applied Technical Mathematics I OR
Math 110 Intermediate Algebra or above
41–100 43–55 80-100
*Math 105 Applies to School of Technologies Programs Only

Developmental Courses

ENGL 092 English Fundamentals I (3 ND units: no academic credit)
Designed for students whose placement test scores indicate the need for review in the fundamentals of communications, this course concentrates on grammar, mechanics, spelling, and the writing process to prepare the student for English Composition I. Credits cannot be applied toward an associate's degree.

LSKL 095  Reading and Reasoning (4 ND units: no academic credit)
Reading and Reasoning is a four-unit course designed for students whose reading comprehension falls below college level as determined by standardized placement testing. Students will progress through a hierarchy of reading and reasoning skills, content area textbook reading/study skills and critical reading skills necessary for competence in college course work. Credits cannot be applied toward an associate's degree.

MATH 095 Basic Mathematics with Study Skills (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This is a basic preparatory course developing arithmetic skills of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, basic geometry, and signed numbers. The course will incorporate techniques needed to be successful in math, while developing reasoning and problem-solving skills. Credits cannot be applied toward an associate's degree.

MATH 099 Elementary Algebra I (3 ND units: no academic credit)
A basic preparatory course in fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry. Topics include: order of operations, operations with signed numbers, solving first degree equations in one variable and applications, operations and polynomials, solution of right triangles by the use of trigonometry and pythagorean theorem. This course will not be transferable to a four year college. Credits cannot be applied toward an associate's degree.

Additional Introductory Courses

BIOL 095 Intro to Biology (3 ND units: no academic credit)
This course provides an overview of the basic chemical, physical and biological concepts typically covered in a first-level biology course with special reference to human biology. The laboratory includes some dissections. Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward an associate degree. Offered on demand.

CHEM 095 Essentials of Chemistry (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This course is intended for otherwise well-prepared students who require a one-term, pre-college chemistry course to enable then to enter a college-level curriculum. Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward an associate degree and this course in not recommended for students lacking strong math skills.

CMPT 099 Computer Literacy (1 ND unit: no academic credit)
The course presents introductory concepts and techniques in microcomputer fundamentals. Students learn the technology of Microsoft operating systems, the keyboard and keyboard shortcuts, use of the mouse, launching application programs, creating and managing files and folders, document naming conventions, establishing user accounts, managing open windows, moving, copying, deleting, renaming files and folders. Credits earned in this course may not be applied toward the associate degree.

MATH 100 Elementary Algebra II (3 college credits)
This course is a continuation of MATH 099, Elementary Algebra I. This is a basic preparatory course in the fundamentals of algebra. The topics include factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, graphing linear equations, and algebraic and graphical solution of a system of linear equations. This course may not be transferable to a four-year college.

PHYS 095 Foundations of Physics I (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This couse is the first half of a two-semester course designed to prepare the Individual Studies student for entrance into a technical program of his or her choosing. The student will begin by learning some basic tools such as powers-of-10 notation, graphing techniques and vector addition. Then these tools will be applied in the areas of linear motion, forces, energy, heat and temperature, sound, and the reflection and refraction of light waves. Credits earned in this course may not be applied toward the associate degree.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses and Advising
ESL Advisor Contact Information: (518) 629-7244; Marvin Library, Room 211

ESLS 092 Fundamentals of ESL I (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This course is intended for ESL students with intermediate English language skills who would benefit from taking a pre-college level English language course. Classes focus on language development in grammar, writing, vocabulary, and oral communication. Placement is determined by testing and advisement. Open only to non-native speakers of English. This course is appropriate for ESL students who test weak in writing and enter during the Fall term.

ESLS 093 Fundamentals of ESL II (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This course expands on the study of oral and written English begun in Fundamentals of English as a Second Language I. Classes focus on language development in grammar, writing, vocabulary, comprehension, and oral communication. Placement is determined by testing and/or advisement. Open only to non-native speakers of English. This course is appropriate for ESL students who test weak in writing and enter during the Spring term.

ESLS 094 Reading For ESL Students I (4 ND units: no academic credit)
This course is intended for ESL students who would benefit from taking a pre-college level English language reading course. Students read a variety of texts including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, and practice applying ESL reading strategies such as discovering meanings of words in context, summarizing, examining word forms and word deviations, locating main ideas vs. details, outlining, and note taking. Open only to non-native speakers of English.
Co– or prerequisite: ESLS 092, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language I or ESLS 093, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language II or approval of English department chairperson or ESL advisor.

ESLS 096 Speaking and Listening for ESL Students (3 ND units: no academic credit)
This course presents the basic elements of speaking and listening used in Standard American English. It is designed primarily for ESL students with intermediate to advanced English language skills who wish to improve their clarity of speech and listening comprehension skills. Through speaking and listening exercises, students will practice the sounds, rhythm, intonation, and sentence patterns of the English language as well as classroom listening strategies. A language lab component is required. Open only to non-native speakers of English.
Co– or prerequisite: ESLS 092, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language I or ESLS 093, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language II or approval of English department chairperson or ESL advisor.

ESLS 098 Conversation for ESL Students I (4 ND units: no academic credit)
In this course, students practice speaking in small groups or pairs through free and guided conversation, problem solving, and values clarification excercises which focus on issues in American culture. Vocabulary, pronunciation, and correct language structure are emphasized. This course may also include involvement in campus activities and field trips to various sites of interest in the capital region. Open only to non-native speakers of English.
Co– or prerequisite: ESLS 092, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language I or ESLS 093, Fundamentals of English as a Second Language II or approval of English department chairperson or ESL advisor.

Learning Assistance Center Courses

LRAC 090 LAC/Reading and Study Skills Lab (No units: no academic credit)
This is an individually programmed service to improve students' vocabulary, reading comprehension, reading rate, textbook skills, and general study habits. Emphasis is placed on the effective use of the textbook and class notes the student is using in his/her specific course of study.

LRAC 091 LAC/Math (No units: no academic credit)
This is an individually programmed service designed to facilitate students' success in math courses. Instruction will be tutorial in nature, and emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills necessary for successful progress in regularly scheduled math courses.

LRAC 093 LAC/Writing (No units: no academic credit)
This is an individually programmed service designed to improve students' writing skills. Emphasis is placed on the writing process as well as on sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and spelling as they relate to any writing assignment.

LRAC 095 LAC/Learning Disabilities Lab (No units: no academic credit)
This is a seminar-style service designed to help students with learning disabilities make a smooth transition to the college environment. Topics discussed include: understanding what a learning disability is, accommodations available for learning disabled students at Hudson Valley Community College, course expectations, and campus and community support services.